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e - like everywhere

Everybody doing any kind of geometry, calculus or higher algebra will have stumbled over this number:

2.71828182845904523536028747135266249775724709369995...

More commonly it is known as e , Euler's number. You may wonder, where does this number come from and why is it so important? Well... If you are like me that is: waiting for simulations to finish, having 20 minutes of spare time on your hands, and having a tenacious drive to understand things. So come along as I explain two different ways that result explain where this beautiful number comes from.

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My trip to Germany and back

When I last drove to Munich and back, in order to visit my family and girlfriend, I decided to do something especially geeky: track my driving progress. The reason behind me tracking myself was two folded. For one I wanted to see if I could write a full app, front- and back-end to track myself across Europe, but mostly I wanted to keep my folks in the loop of where I am. Usually this was done by repetitively calling or, when having a break, posting or texting many to notify them of my progress. But this is neither live, precise, nor is it a pretty solution. Over a few posts (still to come) I will show you how I:

  • designed the iOS app (in Swift with MVC paradigm),
  • made a horribly insecure web server to track the (sometimes out of order) data, and
  • displayed the entire journey (in correct order) on a Google Map on my webpage.

But for now, here are the tracking results and me waffling about my journey.

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fMRI scan to 3D print (4) - last post

After a long endeavour and many attempts to become part of a study at CINN where I would get a brain scan, I finally did it! Last week, I partook in a study involving EEG/fMRI under the supervision of Dr I. Daly (LinkedIn) and my good friend A. Malik (PhD profile). It was quite a lot of fun (hopefully I get to do more) and as a result I got some reimbursement as well as a copy of my brain's structural data in the form of a NIfTI (*.nii) file. By now I optimised the whole procedure to convert this into a 3D printable model and (one last time) wanted to summarise it here. Continue Reading →

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The World in Infrared

A few summers ago, I bought a cheap second hand DSLR on eBay and converted it to take pictures in infrared. Why you may ask? The reason is twofold: for one we do not see infrared light, and the other reason is that the pictures look familiar, yet alienated. Don't get me wrong, I could have easily taken a picture on my iPhone and applied a filter that makes the result look like IR, but that would not be the real thing. So here I go (waiting for another simulation to finish) and writing a post on my first experiences with IR photography.

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Biochips - Microscopic digital networks that are similar to human tissue

Already the old alchemists have dreamed about the ability to grow miniature beings in their petri dishes. Biotechnologists at the TU Berlin could make this so called Homunculus or "Human on a Chip" become reality (link); or at least something alike. The scientists work on a micro-organism that is capable of simulating human organs and their interactions, and all that in a scale of 1:100000. The applications of such an innovation is to replace countless human and animal test subjects for medical and cosmetic trial studies. Furthermore, this tiny organism is designed to yield results quicker, cheaper and more reliably than using mice or rabbits.

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